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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
for those living near the coast. bill nye the science guy is going the break it down. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ begin. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. flexpen® is insulin delivery... my way. levemir® (insulin detemir [rdna origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes and is not recommended to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. do not use levemir® if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. the most common side effect is lo
tara wall was a senior media adviser for. an associate professor of science at columbia university. a fellow at the roosevelt institute and manuel reyes. thanks for having you here. it's nice to have you. >>> tara, welcome to nerdland. >> how did i know you were coming to me first. >> now i would like you to explain your party. >> lay it all on the table. >> in a certain way, it's so early, i feel silly talking about it. but i do think it's important that we not sort of come out of a win as i've seen both parties do in midterm elections or general elections with this narrative, oh, the other party is over. this is the decisive election. i don't think we see anything like that. when you look at the new herd, what seems to you like the things that are different? >> i think, number one, there are a couple of things. i think as you mentioned, it is a little more diverse, both ethnically and sexwise. i mean, you have a few more women which i think is great. i think after any election, everybody does recalibrating and lessons learned. i think what you don't want to lose sight of is the f
first. that's at stake here. >> michael is talking about some sort of political science version of the way a negotiation should take place. >> no. >> what happened in the last election is that republicans ran on this position where they were beating the hell out of democrats for cutting medicare. i mean ryan -- with the ryan/romney ads were downright hypocritical and the president has greater political strength coming out of this and he's got his own plan and he's been specific on his own terms and i think when geithner sits around uttering the same talking point over and over again about tell us what you're talking about, i think it's a fair thing to do. i think the president has a political strength right now to force the republicans to offer their own very unpopular -- >> we'll see. that's what's going to get played out over the next few weeks. >> it's chicken. >> he has more leverage. doesn't have all the leverage. >> he sass some. >> he's coming out strong. >> what leverage do the republicans -- i mean yes, they have some. >> they control the house. >> yes. >> that is the f
, this is not rocket science. that piece is very easy to -- >> but once you do that, why don't you admit you're not -- you're going to let the top rates go back to 39.6%. >> you can do that but this is the kicker. the republicans want to see that they're actually going to get something in the bargain that's going to be real and genuine, not the promise for cuts in entitlement spending four or five kongss from now but in the next -- >> let's talk turkey. everybody on the o shows do it their way. i want to do it a certain way. >> of course. >> of course. sarcasm won't stop you, might not have you back here again. i'm just kidding. you're invaluable. let's go with this thing. during the cuban missile crisis kennedy and khrushchev were communicating through different ways. kennedy was trying to communicate i will do it this way, this won't work for you stick, this will work for you. so they found ways to communicate. is there a communication going on head to head between the president and the speaker right now? >> as of -- >> are they thinking back and forth? >> as of last wednesday they spoke o
we have a more sort of science based and intellectually based argument about, you know, the harmful environmental effects versus the economic benefits and come up with the stuff chris is talking about the disclosure on how it's done. there has to be a mechanism of how to do that. >> a lot is behind the curtain of proprietary information. the second thing about the economic benefits of this, mine one is, it's driving down the cost of electricity and it's killing the coal industry from my perspective someone primarily cared about the climate, that's great. coal is a nasty substance. it's bad for people's lungs, bad for the climate, et cetera. driving costs so low it's crowding out renewables. this other effect that can be bad. in terms of jobs, we have the highest levels of employment in natural gas and oil extraction since 1992. the total jobs in extraction 200,000. not creating a lot of jobs in the industry. >> you're going to have more on your show this weekend, my friend. >> tomorrow. >> a little tease. >> tomorrow there's going to be an in depth conversation of fracking. >> and i
change between natural gas and coal is still somewhat a question mark. it looks based on most science we have now cleaner than coal, but we just don't know. we don't know a lot about the local impacts and how long these prices stay low or how long the wells last. there's a lot wi don't know about it, and it's moving so quickly. i think that's why you see a lot of of this. >> there's a lot of fear. >> and you're someone who is familiar with this. you live in upstate. you consulted for the oil and gas industry and you're a toxicologist, right? what are the fears you hear, and what's yue feeling about how people are understanding the process? >> people are not understanding the process at at all. the information is out there. the industry has been doing this for a while. they have the information, but the problem is a lot of people don't believe what the industry says. so even if the industry -- >> which is not ridiculous. let me just say it for the record, right? this is just as a basic kind of -- i think you're right. what ends up happening is you get this debate, right? the natural gas c
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)